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Developmentalism, Tanzania, and the Arusha Declaration

Developmentalism, Tanzania, and the Arusha Declaration

Perspectives of an Observing Participant

Chapter:
(p.65) Developmentalism, Tanzania, and the Arusha Declaration
Source:
Anywhere But Here
Author(s):
Ikaweba Bunting
Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628461558.003.0003

In “Developmentalism, Tanzania and the Arusha Declaration: Perspectives of an Observing Participant,” Ikaweba Bunting questions existing structures of power through an in-depth exploration of the Arusha Declaration of 1967, a turning point in the history of Tanzania and indeed for Africa as a whole. The Arusha Declaration, brainchild of the late Tanzanian leader Julius Neyerere, was an Africa-centered response to the model of Developmentalism that western governments were pushing onto poor and newly independent non-European nations. A son of the Diaspora and Mrejajiji (returnee), active participant in, and organizer of national development programs, Bunting offers an eyewitness account of the tension between these two approaches: one that reflects an indigenous cultural framework, and—according to the author—a human centered socio-cultural approach; the other is imposed from outside and rooted in the classical development paradigm reliant on the dictates of the IMF and World Bank.

Keywords:   Tanzania, Arusha Declaration, Julius Neyerere, Developmentalism, IMF, World Bank, African Independence

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